HBR OnPoint Magazine Spring 2018

How to Explain a Career That Looks Stalled

People hold on to jobs too long for all kinds of reasons. Sometimes it’s loyalty to co-workers at a company you’ve outgrown, or maybe you spent a long time thinking you were just about to get promoted… but never got the call. Or perhaps you simply had a lot going on in your personal life and your somewhat dull job felt steadying. During the downturn, many people decided to stay in whatever job they had, figuring that any job was better than no job.

Whatever the reason, if you’ve stayed in a role long after your growth and learning in that role plateaued you need a plan for presenting your experience to recruiters and hiring managers. If this is the flavor of your resume – if your last decade sounds like the same year repeated 10 times — you’ll face tough questions as you look for a new job. When asked about your learning, your challenges, and your career plan, your answer cannot be a variant on “I played it safe.”

(Author John Lee followed by commentary from Andre' Harrell CEO/President AH2 & Beyond Consulting)

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https://magazinesubscriptionsdigital.zinio.com/www/browse/product.jsp?productId=500632162#/

Harvard Business Review March 2015 ISSUE

HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW MARCH 2015 ISSUE

MAKING DUMB TEAMS SMARTER

All too often, groups fail to achieve the storied wisdom of crowds. In recent years, behavioral research has begun to identify precisely where groups go wrong. But so far this academic work has yet to have a noticeable effect on actual practice. The two main reasons for error are "informational signals" (some group members receive incorrect signals from other members) and "reputational pressures" (people silence themselves or change their views to avoid serious penalties). These two factors lead to four separate but interrelated problems: (1) Groups don't merely fail to correct their members' errors; they amplify them. (2) They fall victim to cascade effects, following the statements and actions of those who went first. (3) They become polarized, taking even more extreme positions than originally. (4) They focus on "what everybody knows," ignoring critical information that only one or two members have.

(Authors Cass R. Sunstein & Reid Hastie followed by commentary from Andre' Harrell CEO/President AH2 & Beyond Consulting)

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http://www.zinio.com/magazine/Harvard-Business-Review/pr-1629324/cat-cat1960024

HBR OnPoint Magazine Spring 2015

HBR How to be productive

"MAKE GETTING FEEDBACK LESS STRESSFUL"

It’s a certainty that we’ll encounter some poorly-delivered feedback that renders a stressful experience even more distressing, so we need to prepare ourselves to receive some difficult feedback in the moment and strive to make our working relationships and organizational cultures safer, more trusting, and more feedback-friendly.

(Author Ed Bautista followed by commentary from Andre' Harrell CEO/President AH2 & Beyond Consulting)

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https://hbr.org/product/how-to-be-productive-without-burning-out-hbr-onpoint-magazine/OPSP15-MAG-ENG

HBR OnPoint Magazine 2014 Winter ISSUE

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“10 Ways To Get People To Change”

HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW ONPOINT MAGAZINE 2014 WINTER ISSUE

How do you get "Leaders", "Employees", "Customers", and even yourself to change behaviors? Executives can change strategy, products and processes until they're blue in the face, but real change doesn't take hold until people actually change what they do. Listed are 10 approaches that appear to work

(Listed by Morten Hansen followed by commentary from Andre' Harrell CEO/President AH2 & Beyond Consulting)

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 http://www.zinio.com/pages/HarvardBusinessReviewOnPoint/Winter2014/416320984/pg-10

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